Interview with Jo B. Hayve

I adore social media at times. It was all down to a chance connection on my Twitter feed that I connected with Jo B. Hayve, author of the amazing novel, Inside Charlotte. You can read my own review of this book here.

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Snappy book cover for Inside Charlotte!

She has been very kind and agreed to do an interview for me, which is very exciting. Read on to find out more about this enigmatic lady…

 How long have you been writing generally, and in the erotica genre in particular?

Apparently I’ve always been a story teller. Even in first grade, I’ve been told, I would make up elaborate tales for the class. I’ve been actually writing stuff down since the fourth grade, when I tried to write a play from an old fable–I think it had an elephant and an ant. I used to write, at least in my head, sequels to movies I liked, and sometimes to movies I hated, to fix them. But I was never good at rewriting, and hated the whole submissions process, so I never tried to make a living at it. And I was never satisfied with what I wrote–I always felt like I was trying to write to other people’s standards rather than my own. Then about three and a half years ago I was deep in a long writer’s block, like seven years long, and couldn’t write more than a sentence or two. So one day I was visiting my parents, and they had left me in the car while they delivered pet medicine to a friend of theirs (yes, just like the opening scene in Charlotte), and I pulled out my IPad and started writing a story I’d had in mind a long time, about a twelve year old named Charlotte, who had magical powers. Within a sentence or two she had transformed into a 37 year old going through a sexual identity crisis, and I kept writing, happy that I could write anything. The story turned into the whole Charlotte saga. I had never even read erotica before, and I think that helped motivate me, because I wasn’t all tied up over how it was supposed to be written. I was just enjoying what I was writing. So I just started brainstorming. Then for a while, I wrote this story in every spare moment I had, until finally I just ran out of story and left it. A year later I reread it, liked it, and decided to self-publish it. By the time I had finished rewriting it I had other stories in mind. So I’ve been writing erotica ever since. Basically about a year now.

 What inspires you to write your stories, and about feminism especially?

Feminism I’ve long been inspired about. All forms of equality have always inspired me. I think that comes from growing up in the US South, in Mississippi, and watching how people were. Both sides, really. I could see how frightened some people were of changing, and how that fear came out as hate, or as a need to control the people they were afraid of. Right now in the US Muslims and Latino immigrants are bearing that burden. So a big part of why I’ve always wanted to write was to correct inequality, to make people understand differences and not be afraid of them. Erotica lets me do that in a playful, hopefully sometimes touching, way. The specific stories, I don’t know what inspires them. I just come up with an idea, and sometimes daydream it out, and other times just start writing and let the story come as I write it. I’m into the idea now that sex is the root of sexism, and attitudes towards sexual propriety and morals are the way women are controlled by the system. So my stories tend to be about breaking the taboos of the system. I don’t mean the big taboos, like incest or bestiality. I mean the more general taboos about sexually active women, monogamy, affairs within a marriage. And of course homosexuality. Although when I started writing Charlotte, that was a bigger taboo than now. It’s astounding and amazingly hopeful how much that one issue changed in just a few years.

 What kind of research, if any, do you do for your work?

Oh, the usual. I try things out when I can. When that isn’t enough, I ask other people, or just listen to them. When that fails I use the Internet. I have a fear that a crime will happen one day and my computer will be seized, and my search history will be used to demonstrate how obsessed with sex I am. Oh yeah, and porn helps. That will be used against me, too. Porn is a problematic resource. Some of it is so horrifically sexist and objectifying that I can’t stomach it. Some is fun, though.

What is your daily writing routine like? Do you have any rituals?

No, I have no routine, or ritual. If I get a moment, I write. I wake up in the middle of the night sometimes, grab my laptop, and hide out in the bathroom to write. Sometimes I let my writing override my other responsibilities, but that catches up with me, and I have to leave writing alone for a while. I’d like to get to where I write all day long, but so far life doesn’t allow that.

 Pen and paper, or straight-to-keyboard writing?

Keyboard. Now and then I find paper useful. I’m such a slow writer that it helps me write tighter, because I don’t want to waste extra pen strokes. But that is rarer and rarer. I hate transcribing back to the computer, too. On a keyboard I can fly.

 Why did you choose to self-publish?

It’s quicker, and easier, and no one can tell me what to publish. I can finish a story to say what I want it to say, put it online, and move on. That just fits the way my mind works better.

 Do you believe there is still a place for traditional publishing these days?

Probably. They are good marketers and distributors. They can provide huge advances to free a writer up to write and rewrite. I think people still trust traditional publishers to turn out consistently high-quality stuff, too. A lot of Indie work is rife with bad writing and typos, so readers are cautious with a new Indie writer. On the other hand, Indie writers can go against the trends, take risks, avoid constricting editorial standards, and generally be more innovative and impulsive. Also, we can charge less because we have fewer expenses. So, I think readers with time constraints might favor traditional publishers, because they expect a generally higher consistency for the limited number of books they can read, but readers with voracious habits do better with Indies, because they can read a lot of stories for less, and because they can hear different voices without the identity-stealing filter of editors and publishers.

 Fifteen Fabulous Favourites:
1. Colour

Blue

2. Food

Don’t know, but I’m vegetarian, so it isn’t bacon.

3. Fruit

Blueberries

4. Day of the week

Whatever day it is. I don’t always pay attention.

5. Film

Amadeus

6. Erotica author

Anais Nin.

7. Restaurant

It’s in Austin. El Naranjo. It’s a Oaxacan cuisine.

8. Drink – non-alcoholic

Coke, sadly.

9. Drink – alcoholic

Sazerac

10. Celebrity

Willie Nelson.

11. Holiday destination

The beach. Especially a Caribbean beach. Puerto Rico, maybe.

12. Biscuits

Too much of an oceanic language barrier there for me to answer that. Here a biscuit is a specific food, not a type. 🙂

*after a helpful hint…*

Peanut butter cookies are my favourite.

13. Car

Prius. Used to be Saab, but they stopped making them.

14. Fictional Heroine

Lisbeth Salander

15. Fictional Hero

Jean Valjean.

 What ís next for you, writing-wise?

A couple of ideas. I have a series going now that I like, called Complex Erotica. There are a few more stories there to work with, though they are shorter fiction (about 12,000 words a story). The other is a sequel to Charlotte, based on the character of Bridget (who shows up first in Into Charlotte), a few years after the Charlotte series.

List your social media links here:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jobhayve/?ref=hl

Twitter: https://twitter.com/JoBHayve

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/13987175.Jo_B_Hayve

And my own web page: http://jobhayve.com/

Effrenata Lifestyle Festival – Kitty reads aloud to a live audience!

And now for something completely different, as they say…

A trusted friend called me up one evening with a proposal.

“I’ve got a massive opportunity for you!”

I’d never heard of Effrenata before and I was intrigued. A lifestyle festival, you say? Outdoors in rural Warwickshire? To read aloud to a load of kinksters…?

Oh, go on then! what’s the worst that can happen?

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Photo by Kash-R Photography. Stunning landscape. Luckily, the horse seemed unperturbed by the goings-on!

 

 

As the event drew nearer, I began to get nervous. When I first picked up my pen and wrote my stories all those months ago, I did not think for a second that I would ever be reading them ALOUD!

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Funky fancy dress!

I worried that I would stammer over my words, that people would be able to tell how nervous I was, and they wouldn’t like my chosen story. Maybe they would heckle and boo me off the stage! My nightmares involved me forgetting my bring my story to read from, becoming panic-stricken and bursting into tears.

Luckily, none of these things happened. It was a fabulous weekend and I really hope I get to do it again. Let me tell you more…

It was a line-up which packed some punch. Vince Vega  and Danny Rampling brought the marquee tent down (almost) with pumping tunes on the Friday and Saturday nights. An impeccable bar service was provided by the charismatic Scott Hawkins and his Artisan Bar Events throughout the weekend.

During the day, there were fetish demonstrations by wonderland, including some intriguing work involving stapling a lady’s back and threading ribbons through them to create the look of a corset woven into her skin. Utterly and magnificently beautiful in a strange way. I almost went for it myself!

Then, of course, there was little old me, with my story, reading to an exclusive audience of kinksters. I very pleased to say it went very well. I did not stammer my words. I did not panic and run screaming from the stage. Most of all, no one booed or heckled! After I had finished, there was a short question and answer session and then my audience gave me a most welcome round of applause, and I got myself a well-earned drink!

All in all, a fantastic weekend, and something which I am considering doing again in the future. It was great to connect with readers directly, and have them listening intently to my work. I was even lucky enough to be approached by some of them to ask for advice on how to start writing.

Well, I guess now that Autumn is well and truly upon us, the festival season is over for another year. However, come 2016, look out for me in a marquee near you. Stay tuned to my Facebook page and Twitter feed for more up-to-the-minute news about public appearances!